Clear waters increase visibility to shipwrecks on Lake Michigan

For much of the year, visibility on Lake Michigan is obscured by either ice in the winter or algae blooms in warmer months. There is a window in the spring, however, when the water is unusually clear and a variety of shallow-water shipwrecks can be viewed from the air.

The US Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City has noted that this is the time of year when crystal-clear water conditions allow sunken vessels to be spied from above during routine patrols.

Two years ago, Coast Guard officials came across several shipwrecks in the area near Sleeping Bear Point known as the Manitou Passage Underwater Preserve, which is “one of the richest areas in Michigan for shipwreck diving,” according to the preserve’s website.

The lumber industry put the area on a shipping route. The North and South Manitou Islands, just north of the point, provided a somewhat sheltered area for ships hiding from storms, according to Smithsonian.com.

Map of Lake Michigan.

It is estimated that 6,000 ships have been lost on the Great Lakes over the years, with approximately 1,500 of these vessels having gone down in the waters of Lake Michigan, according to National Public Radio.

Of course, far more shipwrecks are beyond viewing. The lake, which covers more than 22,000 square miles, has an average depth of nearly 280 feet and reaches down to more than 900 feet in some locations.

While not much is known about many of the wrecks, a large number of which sank in the 19th century, they do include the James McBride, believed to be the first to carry cargo from the Atlantic Ocean to Lake Michigan in 1848. The vessel,  a 121-foot brig, ran aground during a storm on Oct. 19, 1857, and her remains lie in 5 to 15 feet of water.

Like other Great Lakes, visibility on Lake Michigan decreases as the year goes on, due to algal blooms fueled by agricultural runoff. Warmer temperatures will likely nurture the blooms and obscure the wrecks in the summer, according to Smithsonian.com.

(Top: Shipwreck off the shore of Lake Michigan. Image taken in the spring of 2015 by US Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City.)

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7 thoughts on “Clear waters increase visibility to shipwrecks on Lake Michigan

  1. A friend lived in Michigan…used to have one of those fishing cabins on the ice….and he said that the window of clear water was quite a few weeks back in the seventies. Suspect it has closed down a bit by now….
    His stories of Michigan winters gave me no desire whatsoever to visit the place…

    • Michigan is beautiful in the late spring and summer, but the winters are awfully, awfully long. I lived there for a couple of years in my youth, when long winters weren’t such an inconvenience, but I wouldn’t think of moving there now.

  2. Traverse City is magnificent in July and August. The ship pictured in the link below wrecked on South Manitou Island in 1960.

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.allaboutwaterusa.com%2Fwp-content%2Fgallery%2Fsouth-manitou-island%2Fshipwreck-south-manitou.jpg&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.allaboutwaterusa.com%2Fself-guided-tours%2Fshipwreck-south-manitou-island%2F&docid=0-fkAAn7YIxfkM&tbnid=M1RGg7Y07FwuvM%3A&vet=10ahUKEwiBn9Xv5erTAhVDySYKHUiEAp0QMwg1KAAwAA..i&w=700&h=525&client=safari&bih=1019&biw=1920&q=south%20manitou%20shipwreck&ved=0ahUKEwiBn9Xv5erTAhVDySYKHUiEAp0QMwg1KAAwAA&iact=mrc&uact=8

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