The analogy was a bad one, not unlike a illogical comparison

analogies

The above seems plausible enough. I was once in high school and undoubtedly penned a number of bad analogies, though I also recall having considerable difficulty differentiating analogies, metaphors and similes from one another.

While most of my analogies were sports-related – “the sound his head made as it bounced off the pavement was a sharp thwack, resembling the tone of a Nolan Ryan fastball being fouled off by Reggie Jackson” – and many were substandard, they probably weren’t as cringe-worthy as the above.

But, of course, the Internet being the Internet, it turns out that the above analogies weren’t written by high school students but by readers of the Washington Post.

In July 1995 the Post ran a contest asking for outrageously bad analogies, according to the blog Socratic Mama. Readers were asked to write the most hideous prose they could imagine. The above is a selection of those submissions.

It wasn’t long before a sample of these were being gleefully passed around the web, attributed to high school students.

I suppose because nearly all of us were high school students at one time, and most of us have struggled with analogies – at least in practice if not theory – the idea that teens could come up with the above seems utterly plausible.

After all, high school students struggle with analogies in much the same way that a thirsty, yet dignified souse struggles not to break into a trot when he hears a beer truck has overturned just up the road.

To see the Post’s collection of reader-inspired bad analogies, click here.

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4 thoughts on “The analogy was a bad one, not unlike a illogical comparison

  1. I love these – thanks for providing me with lots of excellent material for next term when we’ll be teaching the art of stuffing as many similes, metaphors and other language techniques into one short paragraph.

    • What I like about these is they’re not only funny, but they’re actually instructive. I wouldn’t recommend using any of them, but anyone unclear on the concept of analogies would certainly get the idea after reading through this list. Oh, and there’s nothing like shoveling as many language techniques as possible into short paragraphs, is there? Makes it a delight for the reader to try and decipher.

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