A bumpy trip down memory lane in Germany

The Concours d’Elegance it was not.

The pride and joy of the communist auto industry was on display last weekend in Saxony, Germany, as approximately 550 vintage cars produced between 1949 and 1990 in socialist countries in Eastern Europe were displayed.

Among the “gems” of the Iron Curtain on hand were Trabants, once a mainstay on East Germany roadways, and Warburgs. (One pities the marketing executives who were tasked with putting lipstick on these pigs.)

Around 15,000 people came to the show, which has been held every four years since 2000 and is called “Damals die Renner” (loosely translatable as “They Used to Be Hot”), according to German publication Der Spiegel.

The event coincided with the 100th anniversary of the birth of Erich Honecker, the late leader of East Germany, but organizers insisted the timing was just coincidental, according to the publication.

At one time, Trabant cars were a ubiquitous sight on the roads of communist East Germany,” Der Spiegel reported. “Twenty years after German reunification, the iconic rattletrap autos are becoming increasingly rare.”

Also on display were motorized bicycles, scooters, motorcycles, trucks, tractors, buses and fire trucks, along with police and government vehicles.

Der Spiegel noted that the first “Trabi,” as Trabants are sometimes known, rolled off the assembly line in the town of Zwickau in Saxony in 1957.

A Trabant 500 Limousine

Trabants, which were produced until 1991 and were named by Time magazine as one of the 50 worst cars ever made, have become one of the most enduring symbols of the former East Germany.

However, once the reunification of Germany took place, the Trabant market quickly dried up and the make was discontinued.

Few lamented its demise.

No word on how many tow trucks were on hand at the event to assist with Red-era roadsters unable to make it away under their own power.

(Above: Scene from Damals die Renner, held last weekend in Saxony. Photo credit. Der Spiegel.)

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