As a bit of car enthusiast, particularly older pre-1970 American cars, watching General Motors’ implosion has been particularly painful.

How the company could have squandered the name recognition and customer loyalty built up over the decades in its Oldsmobile and Pontiac brands, for example, to the point that those venerable lines would be phased out seems inconceivable even now, more than half a decade after the last Olds rolled off the assembly line in Lansing, Mich.

So Russ Roberts’ post at Cafe Hayek about a rather odd GM television ad caught my attention:

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It was 100 years ago that Russian literary giant Leo Tolstoy died at age 82. In recognition of his immense contribution to the world of literature, this blog is reprinting excerpts from his works.

Tolstoy is probably best known for his epic work War and Peace, which details the events leading up to Napoleon’s ill-fated invasion of Russia and its impact of that country’s high society, as seen through the eyes of several aristocratic families. 

War and Peace has become noted first and foremost for its famous length, which is unfortunate because it’s a wonderful work of art. A brief example:

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