Hudson River School show coming to SC

Some 45 works from the Hudson River School art movement will be on view at the Columbia Museum of Art next fall, beginning Nov. 17 in an exhibition titled Nature and the Grand American Vision: Masterpieces of the Hudson River School Painters.

These 19th-century landscape paintings are seldom loaned and are traveling on a national tour for the first time, according to the Columbia Museum of Art.

They will circulate to four museums around the country as part of the New-York Historical Society’s traveling exhibitions program “Sharing a National Treasure.’’

The Columbia Museum of Art is the only stop in the Southeast.

The Hudson River School emerged during the second quarter of the 19th century in New York City, where a a group of landscape painters’ aesthetic vision was influenced by romanticism.

The paintings for which the movement is named depict the Hudson River Valley and the surrounding area, including the Catskill, Adirondack, and the White Mountains.

“For apart from the skilfulness and dreaminess of so many of the pictures, the fact that several of them have not been on public display in half a century makes the exhibition even more remarkable,” according to the New York Times.

Among artists whose work will be featured are: Frederic Edwin Church, Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Hill, Martin Johnson Heade, Jasper F. Cropsey, Sanford R. Gifford and Thomas Cole.

The New-York Historical Society houses one of the oldest and most comprehensive collections of landscape paintings by artists of the Hudson River School.

(Above: View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm—The Oxbow, by Thomas Cole, 1836)

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